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Marine Corps Engineer School

Training Command

Camp Lejeune, NC
CEO 1-17 Slideshow
On January 13, 2017  Second Lieutenant Robert Miller, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); familiarizes himself with the MK 153 MOD 0 Shoulder Launched Multi-purpose Assault Weapon (SMAW). The SMAW is primarily employed against buildings, bunkers, field fortifications, armed vehicles, and other hard and soft targets.
CEO 1-17 SMAW
On January 13, 2017 Second Lieutenant Robert Miller, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); familiarizes himself with the MK 153 MOD 0 Shoulder Launched Multi-purpose Assault Weapon (SMAW). The SMAW is primarily employed against buildings, bunkers, field fortifications, armed vehicles, and other hard and soft targets.
On January 13, 2017  Second Lieutenant Clark Kreitzer, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); practices using a  VMR-2 Minehound. The VMR-2 is a compact , dual sensor explosive hazard detector. This device is designed for the detection of buried or submerged high metallic, low metallic, and non-metallic explosive hazards. This piece of equipment is particularly important because of its ability to detect enemy IED’s, which have become the largest threat to our military forces.
CEO 1-17 VMR-2 Minehound
On January 13, 2017 Second Lieutenant Clark Kreitzer, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); practices using a VMR-2 Minehound. The VMR-2 is a compact , dual sensor explosive hazard detector. This device is designed for the detection of buried or submerged high metallic, low metallic, and non-metallic explosive hazards. This piece of equipment is particularly important because of its ability to detect enemy IED’s, which have become the largest threat to our military forces.
On January 12, 2017 Second Lieutenant Robert Miller, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); emplaces a M18A1 Claymore. This munition is a fragmentation munition that contains 700 steal balls and 682 grams of composition C4 explosive. Special-purpose munitions are hand-emplaced and used to create an expedient obstacle, enhance existing one, and attack specific target types.
CEO 1-17 Claymore
On January 12, 2017 Second Lieutenant Robert Miller, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); emplaces a M18A1 Claymore. This munition is a fragmentation munition that contains 700 steal balls and 682 grams of composition C4 explosive. Special-purpose munitions are hand-emplaced and used to create an expedient obstacle, enhance existing one, and attack specific target types.
On December 16, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) train on the shooting range with the M500 shotgun. This weapon is a 12-gauge, manually operated, shoulder fired weapon and is used to augment security forces and Operating Force units, as well as a ballistic breaching tool.
CEO 1-17 FAM Fire
On December 16, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) train on the shooting range with the M500 shotgun. This weapon is a 12-gauge, manually operated, shoulder fired weapon and is used to augment security forces and Operating Force units, as well as a ballistic breaching tool.
On December 16, 2016 Second Lieutenant Aaron D’Silva, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); breaches a door using the M500 shotgun. The shotgun is used to shoot out the hinges and locks of a door in order to detach the door from the frame and enable a successful breach. The M500 is a 12-gauge, manually operated, shoulder fired weapon and is used to augment security forces and Operating Force units, as well as a ballistic breaching tool.
CEO 1-17 Shotgun Breach
On December 16, 2016 Second Lieutenant Aaron D’Silva, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); breaches a door using the M500 shotgun. The shotgun is used to shoot out the hinges and locks of a door in order to detach the door from the frame and enable a successful breach. The M500 is a 12-gauge, manually operated, shoulder fired weapon and is used to augment security forces and Operating Force units, as well as a ballistic breaching tool.
On December 15, 2016  Second Lieutenants Clark Kreitzer (left) and Taylor Hershberger (right), Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); practice mechanical breaching using a sledge hammer and hooligan tool to pry open a locked door. The hooligan tool is a multipurpose tool that is essential for mechanical breaching.
CEO 1-17 Mechanical Breach
On December 15, 2016 Second Lieutenants Clark Kreitzer (left) and Taylor Hershberger (right), Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); practice mechanical breaching using a sledge hammer and hooligan tool to pry open a locked door. The hooligan tool is a multipurpose tool that is essential for mechanical breaching.
On November 16, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO1-17) use carrying bars to carry a top panel of a single story bridge. Medium Girder Bridges are built by connecting different pieces together while also slowly pushing the bridge across a gap. Pictured are Second Lieutenants Kristopher Satterwhite (Back Left), Taylor Hershberger (Back Right), Jacob Petersen (front left), and Oscar Machado (front right).
CEO 1-17 Medium Girder Bridge
On November 16, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO1-17) use carrying bars to carry a top panel of a single story bridge. Medium Girder Bridges are built by connecting different pieces together while also slowly pushing the bridge across a gap. Pictured are Second Lieutenants Kristopher Satterwhite (Back Left), Taylor Hershberger (Back Right), Jacob Petersen (front left), and Oscar Machado (front right).
On October 28, 2016 Marines from Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) level and smooth out a concrete slab as they learn how to place and finish concrete. Pictured from left to right:  Second Lieutenants Andrew Mullen, Kameron Olsen, Salvador Guzman, and Aaron D’Silva.
CEO 1-17 Concrete
On October 28, 2016 Marines from Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) level and smooth out a concrete slab as they learn how to place and finish concrete. Pictured from left to right: Second Lieutenants Andrew Mullen, Kameron Olsen, Salvador Guzman, and Aaron D’Silva.
On October 28, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) learn how to operate a concrete mixer to mix and pour concrete. Engineers need to calculate the right mixture proportions of sand, gravel, cement, and water in order to produce strong and durable concrete. Pictured from left to right:  Second Lieutenant Kameron Olsen, Mr. Eric Schnitzler, Second Lieutenants William Burton, Jonathan Neltner, and Jacob Petersen.
CEO 1-17 Concrete
On October 28, 2016 Marines attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17) learn how to operate a concrete mixer to mix and pour concrete. Engineers need to calculate the right mixture proportions of sand, gravel, cement, and water in order to produce strong and durable concrete. Pictured from left to right: Second Lieutenant Kameron Olsen, Mr. Eric Schnitzler, Second Lieutenants William Burton, Jonathan Neltner, and Jacob Petersen.
On October 20, 2016 Second Lieutenant Jonathan Neltner, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); levels the batter boards of a building layout. Batter boards are a temporary framework used to assist in locating corners when laying out a foundation. They support the building lines during the early stages of construction and are used as reference points.
CEO 1-17 Batter Board
On October 20, 2016 Second Lieutenant Jonathan Neltner, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); levels the batter boards of a building layout. Batter boards are a temporary framework used to assist in locating corners when laying out a foundation. They support the building lines during the early stages of construction and are used as reference points.
On October 18, 2016 Second Lieutenant Kristopher Satterwhite, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); uses an electric hammer drill to clear out concrete from a spall that has been cut out. This must be done before the damaged area can be resurfaced. Engineers need to be proficient in airfield damage repair so that airfield operations can are uninterrupted.
CEO 1-17 Airfield Damage Repair
On October 18, 2016 Second Lieutenant Kristopher Satterwhite, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); uses an electric hammer drill to clear out concrete from a spall that has been cut out. This must be done before the damaged area can be resurfaced. Engineers need to be proficient in airfield damage repair so that airfield operations can are uninterrupted.
On October 18, 2016 Second Lieutenant Taylor Hershberger, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); uses a cut-off saw to cut out a spall on a damaged airfield. This is an important process that allows the damaged area to be resurfaced and allows the continuation of airfield operations.
CEO 1-17 Airfield Damage Repair
On October 18, 2016 Second Lieutenant Taylor Hershberger, a Marine attached to Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); uses a cut-off saw to cut out a spall on a damaged airfield. This is an important process that allows the damaged area to be resurfaced and allows the continuation of airfield operations.
On February 3, 2017 Second Lieutenant Andrew Mullen, a Marine attending Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); places a four pound charge in the grippers of a robot and ensures that it is secure. The four blocks of C4 are taped together and a carrying handle is made with tape and a small stick so the robot has a steady grip on the explosive charge while carrying it down range to the explosive hazard.
CEO 1-17 Explosive Hazard
On February 3, 2017 Second Lieutenant Andrew Mullen, a Marine attending Combat Engineer Officer course 1-17 (CEO 1-17); places a four pound charge in the grippers of a robot and ensures that it is secure. The four blocks of C4 are taped together and a carrying handle is made with tape and a small stick so the robot has a steady grip on the explosive charge while carrying it down range to the explosive hazard.